Genealogy From The Long Ago

(OLD SCRAPBOOK - 1890s)


Editor's Note: We have recently come across an interesting collection of old clippings dealing with Kentucky family history. Since these clippings are about 100 years old, your editor feels they will be of interest to many of our readers. We will continue this column each month until the supply is gone.

Lindsay

Four Lindsay brothers, Joseph, James, Henry, and William, came to Kentucky in 1779 and settled in Fayette County, Kentucky. Joseph and James aided in building the log house at Lexington. Elizabeth Lindsay, sister of the four brothers, married Col. Patterson, March 29, 1780. A split-bottom chair and an old table made by the Lindsays were in possession of Mrs. Jefferson Patterson, aged daughter-in-law of Col. P., who was living at Dayton, Ohio in 1880. The lands occupied by the Lindsay brothers were in that part of Fayette County now called the Sandersville precinct, lying between Lexington and the Scott and Woodford County lines. Don't know their descendants. They were kin to the Steeles.

 

Tucker

Abraham Tucker, formerly of Virginia, late of Illinois, married a Miss Bowles, of Kentucky. Abraham fought in the War of 1812 under the name of his step-father, Hancock, of Virginia; was very young when his father died, and his mother married a Hancock. His father, Tucker, was a Revolutionary soldier. He was of Scotch-Irish descent.

Lee

Henry Lee was born in Loudon County, Virginia, April 2, 1756; came to Kentucky when Mason County was still a part of Bourbon County, about 1778-9. He was sent as a government surveyor with a certificate from William and Mary College. He was appointed a captain of militia of Bourbon County, in 1780, by Patrick Henry, and in 1792, a colonel by Gov. Isaac Shelby; and in 1798, a brigadier general by Gov. Garrard. He was, also, a company lieutenant. His father was Stephen Lee, of English descent. Gen. Lee died at his home in Mason County, October 25, 1845, aged 89. We never knew of a sister who married a Madison.


Kentucky Kinfolks

 Genealogy From The Louisville Hearld-Post-1930's

Edited By J. Emerson Miller
Editor's Note: In the mid-1930's The Louisville Herald-Post conducted a genealogy column featuring materials sent in by its readers. We thought our readers would find the column interesting. We will reprint parts from this column each month. Because they were printed some sixty years ago, we do not have anyother facts except those given below. We hope our readers enjoy the new Kentucky Kinfolks column.

Grymes-Taliaferro-Dedman

Rev. Charles Grymes had a parish in York County, Virginia, as early as 1644, and perhaps, much earlier. He removed after 1651 to Gloucester County, where he died and where his will was recorded. As its records were entirely destroyed there is no more information in regard to him. The name of his wife is unknown, but it is said that he had a son, John, and a daughter, Sarah, who married Robert Taliaferro; first of that family in Virginia. According to the Grymes genealogy, a deed for land on the south side of the Rappahannock River (dated 1672-73) was due Robert Taliaferro, Jr., as the grandson of Mr. Grymes.

Robert Taliaferro, the immigrant from England, was born about 1625 and died in 1687; he settled in York County, Virginia, as early as 1647 and had lands in Gloucester County in 1655. He married, about 1653, Sarah Grymes.

They had seven children: Francis, John, Mary, Catherine, Charles, Richard, and Robert Taliaferro. The latter, born 1667, died 1728, married in 1682, Sarah Catlett. (He seems, also, to have had a wife named Margaret.)

The above statements are taken from published genealogies of the Grymes and Taliaferro families, but do not seem to be entirely correct. Robert Taliaferro, son of Robert Taliaferro and his wife, Sarah Grymes, lived in Essex County, Virginia. In Essex County Deed Book No. 15, 1716 - 1718, there is a deed dated August 11, 1718, from Robert Taliaferro and his wife, Margaret, to Thomas Catlett, conveying "land given by will of Charles Grymes to K_____ Dedman, grandmother of said Robert Taliaferro." The page containing this entry is so badly mutilated that it is impossible to determine the given name of Mrs. Dedman. It is clear from the language of this deed, however, that Robert Taliaferro, Sr., who is supposed to have married Sarah Grymes, really married a Miss Dedman; possibly Sarah Dedman, who might have married first a Mr. Grymes, son of Rev. Charles Grymes, and was, therefore, Sarah Grymes when she married her second husband, Robert Taliaferro.

Rev. Charles Grymes and Henry Dedman jointly patented land on the south side of the Rappahannock, in Lancaster, York, and Gloucester Counties, 1645, 1650, and other years; and it is believed that Henry Dedman died in Gloucester County, where, because of the destruction of the records, nothing can be learned concerning his family. It is probable, however, that he was the father of Christopher Dedman, who died in York County in 1691, leaving a son, Phillip Dedman, whose will was probated in York County in 1721.

 

Nelson-Henderson-Yandell

James Nelson died in Louisville about the year 1830. He had a son, Isham Henderson Nelson, who was under age. Isham Henderson of Louisville was appointed his guardian. Some years later, Isham Henderson died, leaving a widow, Sally Yandell Henderson, and two young sons, Isham and Yandell Henderson.

 

Neale

Joseph Neale, Fauquier County, Virginia, died in 1794 and left five daughters: Sarah, Ann, Polly, Judith, and Joanna. Sarah Neale married Dennis Warner; Ann married Henry Dawes; Joanna married Jeremiah Foster; and Judith married George B. Maddox and moved to Fleming County, Kentucky.

Joseph Neale owned much land in Bullitt County, and it is probable some of his heirs came out from Virginia to claim this property.

 

Bacon-Pemberton-Anderson

Bennett Pemberton was the son of Charles Pemberton of Carolina County, Virginia. Bennett's sister, Delphia, married Larkin Garnett in 1770, and after his death in 1772, she married Henry Gatewood. It is more than likely that Bennett Pemberton married about the same period and, perhaps, in Carolina County.

 

Garnett-Noel

The will of William Taylor, dated October 15, 1756, probated August 15, 1763 in Essex County, Virginia, names: son, John; daughter, Tabitha; daughter, Elvira (Eliza?) Noel; granddaughter, Ursula Noel; grandsons, William Noel, Taylor Noel, and Thomas Garnett; and daughter, Sarah Garnett, wife of James Garnett. The will of John Garnett, Essex County, whose will was probated March 11, 1713, names executors: Thomas Garnett and William Taylor. John Garnett's son, James Garnett, born January 17,1692, will probated in Essex County July 25, 1765, is said to have married three times: Sarah Green, Elizabeth Muscoe, and Mary Rowsee Jones.

 

Floyd-Powell

Wyatt Powell was the son of Richard Powell, Sr., whose will is in Amherst County Will Book 1, page 257. In this will, dated January 25, 1766, proved August 4, 1774, he leaves his son, Wyatt, 400 acres on Thresher's Creek in Amherst County. This land Richard had patented in 1730 (State Land Office Book 30, page 34). Besides Wyatt, Richard had Edmund, named first in the will; Thomas; John, who predeceased his father; Richard; Winifred; Rhoda, under 14 at the making of her father's will; and Clara (1739 - February 22, 1825), who married Capt. David Woodroof. The first name of Richard's wife was Elizabeth.

Richard was living in that part of Goochland, later Albermarle, and still later Amherst as early as 1730, for in that year (Goochland County Records, Order Book 2, page 26) he petitions to be added to the list of tithables. It seems rather likely that Richard was born in Gloucester County.

 

Beatty/Beattie

Thomas Beatty was born June 24, 1799. He was sent to college. He refused to become a minister, and for this reason, in his father's will (Francis Beatty), he was cut off with $5.00. He then went to Louisville, where he is reported to have married a lady of considerable wealth and became a business man of that city.